Volume 4, Issue 3 (2018)                   IEM 2018, 4(3): 79-84 | Back to browse issues page

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1- Mycology Department, Medical Sciences Faculty, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran
2- Mycology Department, Medical Sciences Faculty, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran , shamsm@modares.ac.ir
3- Center for Research & Training in Skin Disease & Leprosy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
4- Medical Mycology Department, Medical Sciences Faculty, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5- Medical Parasitology & Mycology Department, Allied Medicine Faculty, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Abstract:   (73 Views)
Aims: Transportation of clinical samples and long-term recoverability of fungal strains are critical to epidemiological studies. In addition, the study of fungi often requires the use of living pure cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the methods used to preserve culture collections of dermatophytes, consisted of storage in sterile distilled water, cryopreservation with glycerol, preserving in tryptic soy broth (TSB), and freezing mycobiotic agar.
Materials and Methods: in this experimental study, ninety-two dermatophyte isolates belonged to 10 species were tested. The freezing protocol was done in 4 forms of sterile distilled water, cryopreservation with glycerol, freezing mycobiotic agar, and preserving in TSB. The viability of the dermatophytes species was assessed after 3 years at morphological (macro and microscopic features), physiological (Using Dermatophyte Test Medium; DTM, urease test media, and the hair perforation test), and genetic levels by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).
Findings: The survival rate was 84 out of 92 water stored fungal strains (91.3%) and 81 out of 92 mycobiotic agar stored strains (88.0%) and 75 out of 92 glycerol 40% stored strains (81.5%) and 43 out of 92 TSB stored fungal strains (46.7%). Overall, more than 88% of the strains survived in the distilled water storage and freezing mycobiotic agar, methods, while storage in TSB had the least success in the maintenance of dermatophytes.
Conclusion: The procedure to preserve cultures in sterile distilled water is reliable, simple, and inexpensive.
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Received: 2018/07/10 | Accepted: 2018/09/8 | Published: 2018/08/22