Volume 2, Issue 2 (2016)                   IQBQ 2016, 2(2): 15-17 | Back to browse issues page

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1- Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, IR Iran|Department of Medical Microbiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
2- Department of Bacteriology and Virology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IR Iran
3- Department of Medical Microbiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
4- Department of Medical Microbiology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran
5- Clinical Microbiology Research Center, Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam, IR Iran
Abstract:   (3333 Views)
Background: Helicobacter pylori is the most common cause of chronic infection in the human stomach. The infection has universe prevalence in all age groups. Probably, this bacterium is the cause of most common chronic bacterial infection in human beings and infects approximately half of the world population. H. pylori produces urease, an enzyme that degrades the urea in the stomach’s mucous to ammonia resulting in biochemical reaction that leads to increase in pH of the stomach lumen. This allows pathogenic intestinal protozoa to take the opportunity to cross through stomach’s increased pH and cause disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between H. pylori infection and prevalence of parasitic infection in patients in Ilam. Materials and Methods: Following stool samples collection during 2013 in patients with abdominal pain in Ilam, Iran. H. pylori infection was investigated based on stool antigen analysis (HPSA) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in patients who had recurrent abdominal pain. Stool specimens were examined using the direct examination and the spontaneous sedimentation method for detecting the trophozoite and cyst of parasites. Results: In this study, we found 65 patients with H. pylori infection. Out of these 65 patients, the percentage of patients with positive results for Giardia lamblia was 30.7% and for Entamoebahistolytica/dispar was 12.3%. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that H. pylori infection may provide favorable conditions for giardiasis infection; however, this presumption needs further studies with larger sample size.
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Received: 2016/02/8 | Accepted: 2016/02/8 | Published: 2016/02/1